Documentation

Living in the End Times

Participants: Amy Balkin, Aurélien Gamboni & Sandrine Teixido, Rikke Luther, Maja Moesgaard and Joen Vedel

Galerija Miroslav Krajević
Šubićeva 29, 10000 Zagreb
www.g-mk.hr

6/10 — 29/10 2016

Amy Balkin et al.
Amy Balkin et al.: A People’s Archive of Sinking and Melting (State: As of the Fourth meeting of the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts), 2012–

Amy Balkin
Amy Balkin et al.: A People’s Archive of Sinking and Melting (State: As of the Fourth meeting of the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage Associated with Climate Change Impacts), 2012–

A People’s Archive of Sinking and Melting is an ongoing project in which Amy Balkin invites people living in places that are disappearing due to the combined physical, political, and economic impact of climate change to contribute objects from that place. The archive includes natural, manufactured, found, made or discarded material telling stories about places and people affected by radical environmental transformation. While being a testament to the consequences of industrial capitalism the archive also raises questions about ideas of preserving for the future, languages of representation, and the meaning of objects.

 

Rikke Luther
Rikke Luther: Overspill: Universal Map, 2016

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Maja Moesgaard: Slowly but Suddenly, 2016

In Maja Moesgaard’s film Slowly but Suddenly we follow a woman working on her laptop in a kitchen, looking at websites and images on the Internet while she considers how to respond to a world in an age of global warming, species extinction and the financialization of nature. The work is a compilation of footage from travel agencies and climate activists, poetry quotes and animated material, which depicts how our seemingly insulated everyday lives are connected to peoples and ecologies elsewhere. Emphasizing the need to collectivize feelings of being lost, confused, and anxious as a consequence of environmental crises, the film seems to urge us to reinvent a common search for new imaginaries and ways of organizing life. Perhaps this could, slowly but suddenly, create the necessary, potent cracks in the domination of Western thought, capitalism and the fossil fuel industry that so far have prevented any real change from happening.

 

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Aurélien Gamboni & Sandrine Teixido: A Tale as a Tool, 2016

Aurélien Gamboni & Sandrine Teixido
Aurélien Gamboni & Sandrine Teixido: A Tale as a Tool, 2016

A Tale as A Tool is part of a long-term investigation developed by artists and researchers Aurélien Gamboni and Sandrine Teixido based on Edgar Allan Poe’s short story A Descent into the Maelström (1841). Evoking the fate of three brothers caught in a gigantic maelström in the Norwegian Arctic, Poe’s tale has been used by thinkers to conceptualize the dynamics of interdependence between humans and their environment in a situation of imminent danger. It considers how people trapped in a vicious circle can come to understand its dynamics and generate new practical and emotional resources to avoid the threat of catastrophe. The installation consists of material in the form of narratives, testimonies, models and diagrams from Gamboni & Texeido’s research using Poe’s tale as a tool to address the processes of global environmental change. A Tale as A Tool emphasizes that if we are to avoid the catastrophe of the man-made maelström of climate change we need to overcome our fear of letting go of what we know and change our perspective on our way of being in the world.

 

Joen Vedel
Joen Vedel: Between Uneven Timescales, 2016

Between Uneven Timescales is a reflection on the present moment in all its messiness and on the difficulties in capturing this as it unfolds. Over the last couple of years, Joen Vedel has travelled to places where uprisings have taken place, from Greece to Kurdistan and from São Paulo to Paris, documenting life under a permanent state of emergency. During the opening of the exhibition, Vedel live-edited a film that moves through these different sites of revolt, from the recent past to the near future, passing by fragments of conversations, traces of people and the spectacle of representation. Prior to the exhibition Vedel has been shooting new material in Zagreb, which was woven into the archive, thus creating an archive and a practice that seeks to be in time with what it is interrogating. Situated somewhere between a home video, a newsreel and a travelogue, the film is a gesture towards a non-repeatable cinema, one open to improvisation, accidents, and the traces of lived experience.